Category Solar energy

BUILDING INTEGRATION OF PHOTOVOLTAICS

Building-integrated photovoltaic panels do not feature extensively in in­stallations in Australia, whereas they do in the northern hemisphere. Social research on this aspect of photovoltaic technology is limited, with Sylves­ter [23] having studied simulation of photovoltaic filtering on windows in office buildings. Although the participants were in favour of the energy and associated energy cost savings of this technology, they were dissatis­fied with the disruption to natural light in the building. Blewett-Silcock [24] studied public reactions to building-integrated photovoltaic technol­ogy in an English university. He examined whether participants found the materials attractive and found that this depended on the type of building they were asked to evaluate...

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PREVIOUS STUDIES OF MOTIVATIONAL AND ATTITUDINAL FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH RESIDENTIAL GRID-CONNECTED PHOTOVOLTAIC TECHNOLOGY

Studies of understanding and attitudes to domestic installations of grid – connected photovoltaic systems have largely been conducted in Europe and America, and generally show that citizens have positive attitudes towards GCPV [20]. Some populations while having a positive attitude towards GCPV tended to confuse such installations with roof-mounted solar hot water [21]. However, only a small proportion of a population are prepared to invest in such technology. Oppenheim [22] refers to 1% of consumers in two American cities being willing to pay extra to have pho­tovoltaic panels on their roof. Faier and Neame [7] note the lack of uptake of a combined photovoltaic and thermal solar panel system made avail­able in England under a grant system that provided 50% of the installed capital cost.

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SOCIAL LEARNING

Social learning is briefly reviewed to articulate essential components re­quired for a social learning process in relation to domestic grid-connected photovoltaic systems. The facilitation of social learning is critical to the process of developing citizen proficiency in understanding science and technology. It is designed ‘to enlarge the citizen client’s abilities to pose the problems and questions that interest and concern them and to help con­nect them to the kinds of information and resources needed to help them find answers’ [14]. Schusler et al. ([15], p. 311) defined social learning ‘as learning that occurs when people engage one another, sharing diverse perspectives and experiences to develop a common framework of under­standing and basis for joint action’. Keen et al...

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CITIZENRY DECISIONS TO INVEST IN PV UNDER ALTERNATE POLICIES

A decision to invest in installing a small-scale photovoltaic installation depends upon the inclinations of residents and their level of knowledge of photovoltaic technology, particularly the relative environmental and economic costs and benefits which may accrue from such installation. An STC can be transferred to and redeemed by a photovoltaic installer, reduc­ing the capital investment costs of a typical 1.5-kilowatt (kW) installation to around Australia $3,000 at the time of the workshops in early 2012.

This system of STCs was preceded by a Federal government rebate scheme between 2000 and 2009 which resulted in the installation of 107,572 units generating 128 megawatt (MW) [4]...

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THE PROMOTION OF DOMESTIC GRID-CONNECTED PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRICITY PRODUCTION THROUGH SOCIAL LEARNING

GREG HAMPTON and SIMON ECKERMANN

12.1 BACKGROUND

12.1.1 PUBLIC UNDERSTANDING AND POLICY CONTEXT OF GRID-CONNECTED PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRICITY PRODUCTION IN AUSTRALIA

Use of grid-connected photovoltaics (GCPV), which involve the installa­tion of photovoltaic panels (PV) on a roof or external wall and generating electricity for use and/or export to the grid, has been in its infancy in Aus­tralia. GCPV is a renewable source of power without environmental cost in producing electricity once installed or the need for land to be used and has minimal transmission or distribution cost [1], while having up front panel, inverter and instillation costs. Much of Australia has an ideal climate for

The Promotion of Domestic Grid-Connected Photovoltaic Electricity Production through So­cial Learning...

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LEGAL-REGULATORY CONCERNS

As described in Part Two of the report on the transmission controversy, Louis Bacon, who owns the Trinchera Ranch, has hired attorneys to op­pose Xcel Energy and Tri-State’s application for a CPCN to build the transmission line. In interviews, Valley stakeholders had identified Louis Bacon’s opposition to a proposed transmission line.

End of excerpt. To view the full report, please use the citation information on the first page of this chapter.

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WILDLIFE CONCERNS

Concerns were expressed about the possibility that the transmission line would bisect wildlife corridors in the La Veta Pass and Trinchera Ranch areas and that transmission lines can be hazardous to birds. According to some residents, power poles can give raptors an advantage over the other species because transmission lines are required to provide raptor perches.

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FEAR OF LOSS OF CONTROL

As noted earlier, Xcel Energy and Tri-State would be granted eminent do­main should they be granted the CPCN for the transmission line. Some comments expressed fear of loss of local control of property legally con­demned under eminent domain.

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